Archive for the ‘ Art ’ Category

Being Thankful: My 2010 Gratitude List

I have to admit that I’m not a big fan of Thanksgiving. It’s not that I’m ungrateful. I just don’t like the meal around Thanksgiving. I’m not a fan of turkey, candied yams, cranberry sauce or pie.

I really hate pie.

I do love watching football and being lazy with my closest family members and friends. I’ll give Thanksgiving that.

It’s also a time to sit back and really think about what I’m thankful for as the year comes to a close. So, here’s my gratitude list for the year.

This year (2010), I am grateful for:

  • My husband. There aren’t enough words to explain why.
  • My two boys, who continue to grow into amazing human beings right before my eyes.
  • Friends and family. I have an amazing support system and don’t know what I’d do without them.
  • The ability to meet G at the bus stop each day after school.
  • A pretty darn good work / family life balance. Even when it gets a bit overwhelming.
  • The overall good health of said friends and family.
  • New opportunities and old standbys.
  • Two stubborn Siberian Huskies who are getting older but still manage to act like puppies when they get the chance.
  • Accidents that didn’t turn into tragedies.
  • Music and art that moves me.
  • The words that flow through my brain.
  • My voice.
  • Bacon.

What are you thankful for?

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Art That Moves You

I love art. I love looking at it. I love experiencing it.

I love it when a painting or photo or even a beautifully designed chair stops me in my tracks. There’s just something about certain objects that move me. Usually it has something to do with bold colors, a graphic image or a really simple subject.

Maybe that’s why I love this piece of artwork by my 5-year-old son, G. I first saw it on a bulletin board at his school. I didn’t know it was his, but I had a feeling it was. It was on the bottom, right-hand side of the board, and the only one without a name. Despite it’s location on the board, it stood out to me.

G noted that it was his, and that it was two apple trees next to each other.

Maybe it’s because it was my child that created the picture, but it moved me. It’s the first work by G that really made me think about him as the artist behind the picture and not just the child that completed a school project.

At the same time, I can see the influence of my husband and me in this picture. The symmetry and neat construction come from my accountant husband. The balance of color and graphic quality come from the more artistic, right-brained mom.

What really struck me is that I can see his vision in this piece of artwork. It didn’t look like any other “tree” on the bulletin board. It was well-thought out and presented in a way that was truly G.

Time for this proud mom to buy a nice frame.

Six creative ideas for preserving kids’ school papers and art projects

Ever since G started kindergarten, I have been overwhelmed with papers and artwork. He has a folder that goes home with him each day, and it seems like it is constantly stuffed to the brim with worksheets, notices and art projects.

Not wanting to throw anything away, I initially started to keep everything in a folder. I had visions of myself flipping through its contents at the end of the school year, seeing how much G progressed in his first year of elementary school.

I couldn’t close the folder by mid-October, and I decided I needed a new tactic. (Actually, a few.)

Following are six creative ideas to preserve all those papers and projects your kids come home with. Some of them are mine, and some came from friends. (One friend pointed out that as the kids get older, the colorful papers and crafty creations get replaced by actual work. So, preserve early!)

  • Scan and/or take pictures of everything and save it to CD-ROM or flash drive. At the end of the year, you can make a photo book, complete with captions and stories about the projects. (I have G explain to me what each of his pictures depict. Like any artwork, it has more meaning when you hear how the artist was inspired.) With a program like iMovie, you can even make a short video with pictures, subtitles and music. And as an added bonus, you have some great gifts for the grandparents!
  • Put together a binder. If you’re not into digitizing everything, a binder is a good alternative. Use a 3-hole punch or sheet protectors to make a nice book of preschool, school or daycare papers and projects. I made G an “ABC 123” binder with all the worksheets he completed in nursery school. It was a fun way to see G’s progression in writing, and he used it as a reference when he wanted to remember what the letters looked like.
  • Store the papers and projects in a safe place. You can’t put larger items in a binder. Mid-preschool, I purchased a bin to keep my favorite pictures and larger art projects that came home with G from daycare and preschool. (The fridge got way too full.) Along with a date, I indicated where the artwork came from (school or daycare) and any necessary description of the piece. (It may look like a spider when you put it in. After a while, it just looks like scribbles, even for Mom.)
  • Create your own art gallery at home. Designate an area of the house for exhibiting the very best works of art. It could be a bulletin board in an office or kitchen. One of my friends strung some rope along her kitchen wall and hung her kids’ artwork on it with clothes pins. We converted a second kitchen in our house to an art room and fill the walls with an ever-changing gallery of work. Of course, if you’re short on space, there’s always the fridge.
  • Frame the really good stuff. Some pieces are just too good not to display in a more permanent manner. Showing off colorful kids art in a nice, black modern frame can bring some real pop to a room. For a more dramatic look, cut out a portion of the picture and use a larger white matte when you frame it. (Don’t forget to date it!) I framed G’s first paper from preschool, added a picture from the first day of school and created an instant keepsake for the hallway wall. The possibilities are endless when it comes to framing, and the framed artwork also make great grandparents gifts.
  • Make some placemats. I can’t remember where I heard this idea, but I thought it was a pretty good one. If you have a laminator (or access to one), take the pieces of artwork and laminate them. You can use them as placemats. They are easy to clean, and you can change them out on a regular basis.

In the end, you have some wonderful pieces of artwork to share with your family and friends. And you’ve preserved some very precious memories. Plus, it’s a great way to see how much your little one has grown up (both for him and you).

I’m sure I’ll be opening that bin of artwork for G in a few years, yearning for the days of the overwhelming simple alphabet papers and art projects.

It’s all about perspective, right?

Have some creative ideas of your own? Please share in the comments section!